Thread for pearls - An extract - Lauren Speeth
Thread for pearls - An extract

Thread for Pearls by Lauren Speeth – An Extract

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Thread for Pearls is a début novel by Lauren Speeth, an American author. It is an interesting book that enlightens the reader about the life of children born in the politically rife 60’s and 70’s of America.

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Thread for Pearls – An extract

From the seventh chapter TRIPS

We can’t stay friends forever, Fiona,” said Zach, who’d noticed his nose was running.

“I’m dying. Don’t you know that? Can’t you tell? I’m melting, right into the carpet.” Zach, beginning to panic about his runny nose and to question the source and quality of acid he’d purchased, began a slow wail, that escalated into a scream.

He’d gambled, buying that acid. How could he be sure, as he’d been promised, that the great acid maker—who’d made a local legend of himself selling his wares for local Grateful Dead concerts—had indeed made this particular batch? What if it was a knock-off? What if it was laced with strychnine?

“Get me to the hospital,” he said, crawling across the carpet. “Get me to the hospital. GET. ME. THERE. NOW!”

Fiona got that Zach was serious, and so did the others. His high had hit the stratosphere. They just didn’t know what to do about it.

Had he taken more than they had? Together, they decided they needed to get him to Alta Bates Hospital. He didn’t look so good.

They looked out the window at Zach’s car. It was alive; they could see it breathing, but they couldn’t be sure where it would take them. They decided to walk.

Thirty-seven minutes later, the five friends stumbled into the emergency room at Alta Bates, all holding onto Zach.

The receptionist took one look at the loopy group and knew exactly what she was dealing with. She ushered them into an examining room, and, without a word, pressed each kid into a chair.

Then, before leaving, she asked, “How many hours so far?” Best they could tell, it had been four hours.

The attending physician pulled out his pen light and shined it into the eyes of each patient. He realized they were in better shape than they thought they were, better than most of the kids he’d treated, better than those sad cases he had lost to overdoses.

Most acid trips he’d seen had lasted only six to eight hours, and if they’d been poisoned, they’d have known about it much earlier.

“I’m Dr. Stu Kadish. Call me Dr. Stu. It’s good you came in. You look like bright kids…” he began.

“We are!” said Fiona, “even him.” She pointed to the tiger that had followed them to the hospital and taken up residence on the ceiling. “He’s burning bright!”

Also read: Prey series – John Sandford

Brilliant writing

The writing is brilliant, pulling the reader deep into the book and getting the reader practically live through the historic era through beautifully developed characters.

What are you waiting for? Buy Thread for Pearls: A Story of Resilient Hope right away and have a blast!

Also read: The Traveller – Book Review

About Priyadarshini Rajendran 151 Articles
Priyadarshini Rajendran is a travel enthusiast, avid reader and a passionate writer. She has a few of her books published and is writing more books. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a software consultant taking breaks for her travels. Her blog is her passion and she writes about travel, books and food on the blog. She offers customized itineraries for South Indian destinations.

8 Comments Posted

  1. Seems like a good and educative book, will love to make time for books like this. even though this isnt the kind of book i read when am on a trip but i will love to read this one.

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